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This rendering shows three of about 80 transients, or objects that change their brightness, identified in data from the JWST Advanced Deep Survey (JADES) program. Most transients are the result of exploding stars or supernovae. By comparing images taken in 2022 and 2023, astronomers could detect supernovae that have recently exploded (from our perspective, such as the examples shown in the first two columns), or supernovae that have already exploded and their light has faded (the third column).

This rendering shows three of about 80 transients, or objects that change their brightness, identified in data from the JWST Advanced Deep Survey (JADES) program. Most transients are the result of exploding stars or supernovae. By comparing images taken in 2022 and 2023, astronomers could detect supernovae that have recently exploded (from our perspective, such as the examples shown in the first two columns), or supernovae that have already exploded and their light has faded (the third column).

This rendering shows three of about 80 transients, or objects that change their brightness, identified in data from the JWST Advanced Deep Survey (JADES) program. Most transients are the result of exploding stars or supernovae. By comparing images taken in 2022 and 2023, astronomers could detect supernovae that have recently exploded (from our perspective, such as the examples shown in the first two columns), or supernovae that have already exploded and their light has faded (the third column).

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