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An array of tiny lenses to create sharp images

Today, it is necessary to turn off the light in lecture rooms, conference halls and classrooms if the lecturer wants to project a presentation on the screen, which involves fatigue and lack of concentration of the audience. With the new method the light will stay on

Tiny nanometer arrays of microscopic lenses
Tiny nanometer arrays of microscopic lenses

Tiny nanometer arrays of microscopic lenses, capable of recording or projecting ultra-sharp images with brilliant colors, were presented at the 2011 Nano-Tech exhibition held in Tokyo.

Nowadays, it is necessary to turn off the light in lecture rooms, conference halls and classrooms if the lecturer wants to project a presentation on the screen. Unfortunately, with the closing of the light, the attention of the listeners also fades and fatigue takes over. An innovative method promises to correct this situation. The projectors in the future will not only be smaller and simpler to operate, but they will illuminate so brightly that the images will appear sharp and clear - even in a room full of sunlight.

The image projected on the wall at the nano-tech exhibition emerged from a radiating cube. The prototype of the innovative projector consists of an optical system with a size of about ten square mm and a thickness of three mm through which a powerful LED light shines. The resulting images are extremely sharp and the colors are brilliant - all thanks to nano- and micro-technology.

"The unique feature of the innovative projector method is that the image is already embedded in the micro-optics components. The pixels, only a hundred nanometers in size, are "stored" in a chrome layer located under the lens array. Such a microarray includes about two hundred and fifty microlenses, and under each lens is a microimage. When all these micro-images are projected together by the wall, a complete high-quality image is obtained that originates from an extremely tiny projector," explains Marcel Sieler, a physicist from the Fraunhofer Institute in Germany.

This pocket technology has the potential to replace not only digital and overhead projectors but also cameras. "The future economic forecasts for particularly flat micro-optical systems are very positive since they open a window to a multitude of innovative applications, such as mini-cameras and mini-projectors," emphasizes one of the research partners. He adds and says: "The leap achieved in recent months in the quality of production parallels the progress in televisions from cathode ray tubes to HDTV type televisions." The researchers managed to develop a projector the size of a matchbox. The projector is able to project presentations, videos and movies from a phone/laptop to a wall - at home, in the office or on your feet. Ultra-flat cameras are ideal for monitoring a compound or production area.

A special composition of materials was prepared by the researchers for the production of these microlens arrays - organic compounds containing oxygen, carbon and hydrogen wrapped in an inorganic substrate of silicon oxide and titanium oxide. This composition prevents the plastic components embedded in the material from changing chemically over time and is resistant to heat loads and mechanical stress. The method is very similar to the method used by the Mayans to maintain the stability of the indigo dye over thousands of years by mixing it with clay ore.

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One response

  1. The age of 'death' of the future.
    Live in the present - and experience the future every day.
    An amazing time!

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