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nano-tech

Prof. Rachela Popobzer from the Faculty of Engineering and the Institute for Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials at Bar Ilan University won a grant of 150 euros, for research aimed at making drug treatment more efficient and targeted
The smoothness of a surface can be adjusted by changing its roughness at the molecular level - this is how researchers from Finland demonstrate
Before the successful synthesis, it was not clear if it was even possible to create such a molecule and keep it stable long enough to study its structure and its electronic properties.
Researchers from the Technion have challenged the limits of what is possible in the field of spin-optics at the atomic level. They developed a spin laser from a single atomic layer - a device that does not require magnetic fields or low temperatures
A new material created from natural materials can move quickly through water and carry up to 40 times its own body weight
Researchers at the Technion have engineered a material that may replace silicon in the world of electronics in the future; Through the stretching of the material at the atomic level, they gain control over the material's conduction and insulation properties, thus progressing towards turning it into a fast and efficient switch
First-of-its-kind pioneering demonstration points to the possibility of a greener future for the electronics sector
Researchers built surfaces that direct the growth of nanowires and nanotubes and watched their growth process in real time. The forecast for the future: building advanced devices, such as tiny solar cells
Futuristic water purification? An Israeli company is developing a new desalination method in which nano-robots will clean seawater of problematic salts; This, without removing from them substances that are important for our health
Meet the hybrid microrobot: innovative technology tiny at 10 microns (the size of a biological cell)
Researchers from the University of Santiago in Chile, working in the field of machine learning, have succeeded in developing an innovative method for identifying organic compounds based on the refractive index at a single optical wavelength
A team of researchers from the Hebrew University has developed a device that is able to easily and quickly measure the properties and thickness of surfaces 35 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. The method is expected to significantly optimize the production of solar cells, flat screens and a variety of futuristic technologies
Weizmann Institute scientists present a new method for imaging a single electron
These watches have unique features including small volume and weight and low energy consumption - essential features because they are mobile components powered by batteries. The tiny clock has uses similar to those of normal atomic clocks used for example in navigation systems (GPS), synchronization between communication systems and computer systems.
An international team of researchers succeeded in developing the most stable and porous zeolite known so far composed entirely of silica, which they named ZEO-3
Long and dense spikes formed by a sulfated polysaccharide substance found in red algae were discovered by a research group from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev to have biological activity against bacteria and fungi
Schematic of the measurement circuit (a), theoretical model (b) and resonant frequencies as a function of the gate voltage (c, d).
The technological innovation suppresses the typical shrinkage of printed tissues in the period before transplantation
Volatile molecules may characterize diseases such as tooth decay and gum disease
Discovering the behavior of a material of interest on a small scale could reduce energy consumption in computing
Prof. Dror Pixler from the Faculty of Engineering and the Institute of Nanotechnology is developing optical tools that expand diagnostic and healing capabilities
In a recent study published in the scientific journal ACS Nano, researchers described how they used a tiny robot to clean the entire oral cavity. The researchers created a swarm of "iron oxide nanoparticles", which they controlled using a magnetic field
Nanotechnology engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed tiny robots - micro-robots, in their full name - that are able to swim inside the lungs, reach the bacteria that cause pneumonia, kill them and reverse the damage they do to the body
This discovery of superconducting graphene structures could encourage the development of practical superconducting devices
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